Level I or II Elementary/Secondary Principal Credential

The University of Mary offers educators and administrators the courses required for the Level I and II Elementary and Secondary Principal Credential, issued by the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction. The requirements may be completed online or in a blended format and students are invited to begin coursework in the fall, spring, or summer semesters. Actual requirements may vary, based on current licensure and previous coursework. Final plan of study provided upon transcript review.

Courses

Management Theory and Personnel (3 credits)

Administrators must know how to effectively manage resources in order to attain school objectives. The students study the theories of management and learn how they relate to effective decision-making. Discussion will focus on the study of research and data-based program evaluation, management and the use of information systems, planning, and education improvement processes. By concentrating efforts toward these areas, administrators will develop effective management skills.

School Finance (2 credits)

The quality of fiscally based decisions that impact the students who attend our schools is often dependent upon the knowledge and judgment of the school administrator who understands the relationship between revenues and the development and maintenance of programs designed to benefit students. Attainment of competence in school finance is a lifelong process that requires flexible and analytical thinking. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the fundamental principles that govern school finance.

School Curriculum K–12 (3 credits)

This course explores the foundations, design, development and implementation of curriculum in K–12 and other settings and examines administrators’, teachers’ and leaders’ roles in curriculum decision-making, development and implementation.

Differentiated Instruction (3 credits)

This course fosters the use of differentiated instruction. “Differentiated instruction” is a teaching theory based on the premise that instructional approaches should vary and be adapted in relation to individual and diverse students in classrooms. Graduate candidates are encouraged to evaluate their own teaching strategies and to adopt an approach to teaching and learning that provides multiple options for taking in and making sense of ideas and information. Candidates will also be encouraged to make curricular and instructional decisions based upon student assessment data.

School Law (2 credits)

School personnel must have knowledge of the complexity of legal precedents governing school and student relations, use of public funds, procedural due process and curricular decisions. Students develop an understanding of the federal, state and local precedents impacting local educational agencies. This course is designed to involve students in the study of the factual and technical aspects of problem-solving procedures involved in school law.

School Culture and Organizational Behavior (3 credits)

Effective educational leaders must have a good understanding of organizational behavior and an understanding of how to create the school culture needed to improve student learning. This course is a study of organizational leadership in education, as it relates to decision-making, organizational change, managing conflict, creating strong communication processes and motivating self and others to achieve school goals. The course challenges students to develop and analyze successful models of school reform, while helping them gain a professional understanding of organizational theory and research as it relates to K–12 schools.

School Administration (2 credits)

The administrator’s role in the local educational agency is a multi-faceted leadership function. Students learn the principles of personnel administration and staff development. They also develop introductory skills in curriculum design, budgeting and effective communication.

Integrating Technology in Ed (2 credits)

Educators must have expertise in teaching strategies that effectively integrate current technology into the curriculum. Students are given the opportunity to examine and develop computer-based teaching strategies and techniques that will improve student learning. Emphasis is placed on the examination of computer-based instructional strategies, but students will also examine computer software programs designed to assist educators with other professional responsibilities, including grading, database development, record keeping and research.

Critique and Design (2 credits)

Effective educators are able to synthesize current research and develop new knowledge through investigation. To develop their research skills, students study the components of the research process and the methods employed in conducting experimental and descriptive research with application to the field of education.

Internship: Secondary Admin (2 credits)

School personnel have developed skills in their areas of study that are augmented by field based experiences under the supervision of master teachers and administrators. Students practice their knowledge and skills at practicum sites or other school environments. Through the internship/practicum, students have practical experiences in their areas of emphasis as well as experiences such as site based decision making, personal relations, curricular planning, organization and time management, and student relations.

Internship: Elementary Admin (2 credits)

School personnel have developed skills in their areas of study that are augmented by field based experiences under the supervision of master teachers and administrators. Students practice their knowledge and skills at practicum sites or other school environments. Through the internship/practicum, students have practical experiences in their areas of emphasis as well as experiences such as site based decision making, personal relations, curricular planning, organization and time management, and student relations.

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